Race Recap: Xterra Lums Pond 12k

Race Recap: Xterra Lums Pond 12k

This past Sunday I raced at Lums Pond State Park in Bear, DE for the first time ever.  I knew of some people that had ran and mountain biked at Lums Pond so I kind of knew what the terrain was going to be like ahead of time – flat, non-technical, but with a few scattered rooty sections.  None of these characteristics of the course played in my favor.  Truthfully, I have a better chance excelling on a hilly, technical, rocky course.  I wasn’t looking forward to this race at all and, honestly, I regretted even signing up for it.  I only signed up for it because it was part of a series of trail races and back in January/February I was desperate for some motivation to get myself out for runs.  So here I was on race morning, standing in a state park parking lot trying to find an inkling of trail serenity in a road-runner dominated field of runners (sorry, roadies).

Josh selflessly chauffeured me to Bear, DE so I was thankful to have him there to be my morning company.  I picked up my bib number and race swag and got back into Josh’s truck.

The morning was chilly but warmer than usual so I was trying to figure out what I wanted to race in.  I went for a warm-up with 3/4 length capris, an Altra sweatshirt, Sneakers & Spokes long sleeve, a base layer long sleeve, gloves, and my Team Altra buff.  I warmed up on the road for 10 minutes than discovered a trail that ended up being the last 1/4 mile of the race course.  By the end of a 15-minute warm-up, I decided I need to shed my base layer for the race.  I also decided I wanted to race in shorts and ditch the gloves.  Wardrobe malfunction!  My Sneakers & Spokes long sleeve was so long that it covered up my spandex shorts making it appear that I wasn’t wearing shorts.  DARNIT!  I tried pinning the bottom of the shirt up but it was a lost cause once the race started.

The race started on time and we ran across the parking lot towards the path.  We would be running one 6-7 mile clockwise loop around Lums Pond (literally, I giant pond).  I navigated around some racers and I could see 2 women in front of me.  I hoped to keep them in my sight, but that didn’t last long.

1.5 miles into the race I found myself pancaked on the ground.  My memory fails me, but I’m assuming I tripped on a root.  I had no chance to catch my fall.  One second I was running, the next second I was on the ground, and one second after that I was back to running.  The men behind me asked if I was ok.  I said bluntly, “yes, I’m fine”, as they sprinted around me.  Nothing hurt but I could see some blood on my thigh.  Not exactly how I wanted to run the next 5.5 miles of the race but oh well.

The course wasn’t exactly scenic.  There were a lot of little turns, some rooty sections, and very small “hills”.  The “hills” were basically speed bumps that slowed racers down a little but they took about 3 seconds to get up and 2 seconds to get down.  Not impressed.  I had lost complete sight of the women by this point, men were passing me left & right, but I just kept chugging along.  I was more focused on where I was putting my feet and less focused on catching anyone ahead of me.  My elbow started to sting but everything else felt fine.

I remember crossing a 200m mini bridge which was pretty cool.  I jumped over a few muddy spots to avoid soaking my Superiors.  We passed through a field.  Then we reached the part of the course I had ran earlier for my warm-up.  I knew I was almost done.  I heard Josh to the right and caught a brief glimpse of him with his phone out snapping pictures.  I crossed the finish line and they handed me a medal.

I looked down at my knees for the first time since I’d fallen and both were bloody.  My thigh looked like a bear scratched it up.  My elbow was still stinging.  I knew I needed to get my cuts cleaned up so I looped back to find Josh, told him I needed to clean my knees (which is actually when he even noticed my knees were scraped).  We walked over to the ambulance parked in the lot.  I asked them for some peroxide and they gave me saline water and a towel to clean myself up.  I sat haphazardly on the asphalt as I cleaned up.  They didn’t have any normal sized bandaids and I could tell that my right knee was still bleeding so the paramedic wrapped me up with gauze and medical wrap.  Josh told the paramedics, “she runs 50ks up mountains and doesn’t fall but here she is after a 12k…”.  Yes, the irony of it all.

31234945_2028515467407407_1324880377252151296_oI finished in 57:28 as the 3rd overall female and 25th overall out of 98.  The course was shorter than a 12k so technically it’s not a 12k PR.  I stayed for the awards ceremony and then left for the 2nd race of the day – spectating the NJ NICA race held in Alloway.  It was a busy but great Sunday.  I didn’t do a cool-down after the race because I spent my time with the paramedics, but I ran around the NICA course with Josh to cheer on the racers.

Would I race this again?  No.  The course wasn’t hilly or technical (despite the fact that I tripped on a root).  I thrive on challenging trail courses.  This was more so a cross country style race and those days of xc racing were over after college.  I don’t have the speed to keep up with those xc-type of racers.  I would rather go a little slower and be able to bomb some descents.  I still have a good story to tell as I take care of my knees.

Would I go to Lums Pond again?  Yes.  I would like to mountain bike there because I prefer non-technical trails for mountain biking (my mtb skills are lacking).  If I’m looking for a flat trail running loop and want to drive all the way there then I would run there again too.  But I’m not interested in racing there.  One and done!

OT Chronicles Chapter 1: What is OT?

OT Chronicles Chapter 1: What is OT?

As I am patiently waiting for grad school to start in September, I have decided to document my occupational therapy (OT) journey.  By doing so, I hope to help anyone looking into OT as a career.  I am starting “OT Chronicles” in the midst of Occupational Therapy Month (April) to advocate for the field of OT and to share my experiences with potential future OT professionals.

Disclaimer:  Let it be known that “OT Chronicles” is meant to enlighten and share my current knowledge of the OT profession.  Not every question regarding OT will be answered within these posts; however, I hope to enlighten whomever reads them to advocate for and teach others about this wonderful profession!  Let’s begin with the basics!

What is Occupational Therapy?

Without quoting any direct sources, occupational therapy is branch of therapy that aims to assist individuals of all ages engage in activities (occupations) that they both want and need to engage in.  Such occupations can be functional-based for successful living (i.e. showering, cooking, working, cleaning, caring for others, medication management, etc) or recreational (engaging in games/sports, age-based socialization skills, gardening, etc).  Occupational therapy is a goal-oriented career field that helps individuals adapt to their environments so that they can accomplish what they need to do and what they want to do.

Who do OTs provide therapy to?

OTs work with populations throughout the entire lifespan.  Children, adults, and the geriatric population can all benefit from OT when a therapy need arises.

Where do OTs work?

You can find OTs working in early intervention programs (children birth to 3 years old), schools, in-patient and out-patient rehabilitation centers, senior living communities, skilled nursing facilities, or hospitals.  OTs can also provide home health services.  OTs can also have a career as a traveling therapist which provides an opportunity to continuously work in a variety of environments.  The occupational therapy field provides a broad array of settings allowing for a variety of skill sets, environment preferences, and population preferences.

OT through the Lifespan:

Children with developmental disorders, behavioral issues, or cognitives or physical delays oftentimes work with occupational therapists through early intervention or in a school environment.  OTs working with children typically focus on fine and gross motor skills, communication skills, self-care, and learning how to play/interact with others.

OTs work with adults who have experienced severe injuries, who are recovering from surgery, and who have chronic diseases, mental or physical disabilities, eating disorders, the list is lengthy.  OTs working with adults typically focus on activities of daily living (ADLs) skills, return-to-work skills (when applicable), social skills, engaging in individualized meaningful activities, and the use of adaptive skills for safe and effective occupations.

OTs who work with the geriatric population typically work with individuals who have experienced severe injuries, who are recovering from surgery, who have chronic diseases or physical disabilities, or who are experiencing cognitive/memory loss.  OTs working with geriatrics focus on accomplishing ADLS, maintaining or improving levels of independence, engaging in self-care, maintaining cognitive abilities and memory, and engaging in meaningful activities important to the individual.

Why choose OT as a career?

Everyone has a different reason they decided to become an occupational therapist.  I’m not going to share all of those different reasons with you today; however, I will share with you my reason for pursuing OT.  I hosted a balance workshop during my short stint at a fitness center.  I began researching creative exercises for improving balance and I came across several videos involving OTs. BAM!  The field of occupational therapy was nearly jumping out of the computer screen at me!

At the time of this balance workshop, I was feeling shorted for a dead-end career path.  I knew I needed something more.  After researching the field of OT, I discovered how much OT matched with my functional approach to exercises, my desire for a career with endless opportunities for compassion, and my personal ambition to make a difference in the lives of individuals I interact with.  Occupational therapy seemed like a perfect match for me.

So, with that being said, I resigned from my job at the fitness center and put all of my energy towards learning more about OT, applying to grad school, and pursuing the field of occupational therapy.

Here I am now, 5 months away from starting grad school.  I’ve written my 1st ever blog post for “OT Chronicles” & hopefully I’ve enlightened the people who thought that occupational therapists just help people find jobs.  Wrong, very wrong….. stay tuned for more chapters of “OT Chronicles”!

 

Race Recap: Sasquatch Nighttime Trail 5k

Race Recap: Sasquatch Nighttime Trail 5k

Saturday night at 8 PM, I lined up for a 5k for the first time since 2015.  5ks haven’t been on my race radar for three years out of pure enjoyment of ultras and long distance races.  The shortest race I’ve raced in the past three years has been a four mile road race – a 4th of July tradition in my family that is a requirement for an afternoon BBQ invitation.  But, I couldn’t pass up a trail 5k…. in the dark…. on hometown trails…. with a bunch of family & friends.

All day Saturday, I was impatiently waiting for the afternoon hours.  I’d much rather race in the morning so that I can enjoy the rest of the day, eat whatever I want, and relax.  I was less than thrilled when I had to wait all day until I could race. I distracted myself with various errands/chores and I watched the Flyers clinch a playoff spot which was super exciting for obvious reasons.  I ate dinner at 4 PM because I wanted my stomach to be fully settled by start time.

I arrived to the course before 7 PM, snagged a convenient parking spot, picked up the race packets with my parents, and set out onto the trails with my dad and uncle to set up feather flags for our family business & local mountain bike team.  I was extremely confused where the course would be taking us despite knowing the trails inside & out from mountain biking there so often.  I asked my dad a bunch of questions about the direction of the course down certain trails but it didn’t clarify much.

By 7:25, I was wondering where Josh & Jess (Josh’s twin) were as I knew they should both be there by now.  I triple checked that my headlamp was actually on my head (my biggest fear was arriving to the starting line without my headlamp on my head and being forced to run the course in the dark – which would’ve been impossible & torturous).  My Altra Superiors were on snugly and I was ready to tackle the roots within the woods!  Without being able to find neither Josh nor Jess, and with no cell phone service to call them, I set out on a warm-up run with my dad, uncle, mom, and my mom’s cousin.

While out on the course we spotted the Sasquatches arriving to their designated spots on the course.  My dad told the mini Sasquatch to scare me but I told mini Sasquatch that I could out sprint him on any given day. After a ten minute warm-up, we arrived back to the infield where I spotted Josh & Jess.  I was a ball of energy at this point and just wanted to get the race started.  I chauffeured Josh over to my car so he could drop off his race packet in my car & hastily rushed him so that he could get a warm-up in before the race started in less than 10 minutes.  We ran through the in-field a little bit more – a short warm-up would have to suffice for him.  Josh told me he felt nauseous and had no intention of racing hard (more details on that later).

S&S sasquatch groupWe got to the starting line and ushered a bunch of Sneakers & Spokes runners together for a team picture.  We chit-chatted amongst ourselves, tested out the brightness of our headlamps, and waited for the race directors to announce any last minute instructions.  We were told that the reflectors on the trees would guide us through the course and that they should always be on our right – this proved to be extremely helpful knowledge throughout the race.

Before I knew it, they were saying “ready, set, go” through the megaphone and the field of runners surged off.  I remember feeling like there were a lot of people surrounding me that I knew all had to funnel into the trail ahead of us.  All I could do was keep sprinting across the field, hoping that some of them might just be energetic youths eager to start in a full out sprint.

With our headlamps on, we reached the trail entrance and I knew I was near the front of the race.  There was a pack of 6-8 racers ahead of me running three-aside on the trail.  In front of me was a lone runner whom I quickly passed through a sandy section.  The pack of runners ahead of me kept getting further & further away as I could see the light of their headlamps fading off in front of me.  I was running solo with nobody within sight ahead of me and no lights shining from behind me.

Alone, I focused on the reflectors to navigate the way.  I came upon the Sasquatch banging against a tin roof trying to scare us runners but I just chuckled as I passed by.  “One reflector at a time”, I told myself.  I came across someone’s headlamp on the ground and thought that whomever lost that better hope they can keep up with someone who still has a light!  Before I could figure out where I was, the course exited the woods back into the field.  I surged ahead knowing exactly where I needed to go next (home course advantage at it’s finest).  The field was pitch dark and there were just a few spectators out huddling near a small bonfire.

After a steady, low-grade incline on the singletrack, I saw headlamps shining at me.  Am I going the wrong way? How did I mess up the course already?!  Turns out, the course comes very close to intersecting paths but I took a left in my direction and they turned left in their direction.  Crisis everted!  

I continued to power ahead and soon saw a runner up ahead of me.  They were definitely within my reach so I made sure to surge up to them during the non-technical section of the course.  By the time we reached the next hill, I knew that if I could just power through the hill that I could gap them.  He didn’t let me get too far away though.  We reached the only road section of the course – a quarter mile of road until we dip back into the woods toward the finish.  The man got around me on the road but I knew that my strengths on the trail would prove worthy when we got back onto singletrack.

I made a power-move on the final turn into singletrack, nearly running myself into a tree.  I sprinted confidently ahead and saw two small silhouettes ahead of me.  Let me try to catch up to them.  So I kept my foot on the gas trying to catch up to the them.  I knew I was running out of course to catch them but I kept trying.

We exited the woods for the final time into the field and I strided as fast as I could toward the finish line.  I didn’t want the man behind me to catch me in a final sprint.  Race volunteers shined their flashlight towards my bib number so that they could record the finishers.  I stopped by watch at 23:33.

My dad and Josh walked up to me while I was still in the finishing chute.  “Did you win?”, one of them asked.  I said, “I think so!”.  They yelled out in excitement.  I ripped off the bottom of my bib number for the race volunteer & walked over to my dad & Josh.  That’s when they informed that Josh won the race!  HE WON!  I yelled in excitement so loud and gave him the biggest hug.  I couldn’t contain my excitement that we both won!

We walked back along the finishing stretch to wait for our friends & family.  I was coughing uncontrollably because my lungs hurt so bad.  I was still so so so excited that Josh won!  WOW!  We cheered on everyone we knew. This proved to be a difficult task during a nighttime race.  It’s impossible to see people running towards the finish line when it’s dark!

Once everyone finished and we shared our excitement for such a fun and great race, I changed into warm (and dry) clothes, put on my winter jacket and set out on a cool-down run with my dad & Josh.  We talked about our races and shared our excitement for such a cool race on our local trails.  We headed back to the lodge for food, water, and the awards ceremony.  It was so cozy in the lodge which made me happy!

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Jess, me, & Josh with Sasquatch, Mini Sasquatch, & Yeti

Team Sneakers & Spokes came home with 8 individual awards, a new 5k PR, and a racer’s 2nd ever 5k.  It was a fun & enjoyable night and being surrounded by awesome friends & family made the night extra special!

After the awards, I drove to Josh’s.  I reflected on the race and my excitement for Josh’s win.  When we got back to Josh’s it was probably almost 10:30 PM.  We were both hungry so we impulsively decided to make pasta. I ate icecream sandwich cake in the interim because I was so hungry.  By the time we ate pasta and showered, it was nearly midnight.  What a late night.

Reflecting back, I am more than satisfied with how my race went.  I raced hard, I ran confidently, I didn’t back down from the hills or other competitors.  This race boosted my trail confidence in regards to running fast on trails.  I know I can cover upwards to 31 miles on trails mountainous trails, but running fast on trails has never been my strong point.  Although I coughed for an entire day after the race, I would run this race again next year.  The race benefitted Ranch Hope and the leaders & volunteers of Ranch Hope are amazing individuals.

I don’t plan on running more 5ks – I think I’ll stick to one 5k per year & one 4 miler per year.  I prefer all other races to be 10k or more and trail races.  I just find trails to be my strength and I love the trail running scene/community more than anything.

sasquatch winners
Just a “couple” of winners

I am proud of Josh for racing so strong despite having a rough Saturday leading up to the race.  I am proud of his confidence on the trails and his innate competitiveness that apparently just took over one mile into the race.  I am lucky to have him to stand next to as 1st place male and female of the race.

Thanks to Camp Edge and Ranch Hope for hosting a great trail race.  And much appreciation to the Sasquatches who didn’t scare me in the woods mid-race!