Occupational Therapy Month: Fieldwork

Occupational Therapy Month: Fieldwork

Conveniently, letter “f” falls on the last day of my first Level I fieldwork placement. To celebrate, I’m posting that “f” is for fieldwork!

“Fieldwork” is the OT school term for internship, clinical, or rotation. All graduate OT programs require completion of fieldwork placements in compliance with ACOTE (Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education). Fieldwork placements provide students with the opportunity to go out into the a variety of settings to work with or alongside a fieldwork educator to apply what is being taught in the classroom. Fieldwork grants students the opportunity to experience application of occupational therapy in real life settings with clients.

Over the course of my time in the Master’s program at my grad school, I must complete four Level I placements and two Level II placements. For my Level I placements, I will have the opportunity to see occupational therapy practice with pediatrics, adults, older adults, and the mental health population. Level I placements, at my grad school specifically, take place in my second, third and fourth semesters once per week for 10 weeks (disclaimer: every OT program does their scheduling differently). As a student, Level I fieldwork placements involve a lot of observation and trying to connect what was taught in the classroom with what is seen in practice. During these placements, very little, if any, hands-on practice occurs because we are still in the process of learning everything we need to know.

After my academic classes are done (spring 2020), I will begin my Level II fieldwork placements. Level II placements take place five days per week for 12 weeks. For my graduate program, my first Level II placement will occur in the summer (of 2020), followed by my second Level II placement in the fall (of 2020). Level II placements can occur with any population within any setting. At this time, students are expected to competent in completing evaluations, creating interventions, and implementing clinical reasoning skills; therefore, hands-on practice occurs throughout the entire placement. Additionally, we are technically working under our fieldwork educator’s license.

In some instances, emerging fieldwork placements can occur. Just as the term depicts, “emerging” means that these placements are at locations that don’t yet have an OT but would benefit from having an OT hopefully in the future. With emerging placements, fieldwork educators could be facility directors, teachers, or other health professionals. Emerging placements help to advocate for our role in non-traditional OT settings.

I have just completed my first Level I fieldwork placement in a pediatric setting. I feel like the past 10 weeks have flown by and I have most definitely learned a lot from my experiences and opportunities. I am excited to learn where my next placement will be as I am most interested in working with adults or older adults in the future.

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